Ash Is Purest White (2018) - Crime, Drama, Romance

Hohum Score

96

Hohummer

A story of violent love within a time frame spanning from 2001 to 2017.

IMDB: 7
Director: Zhangke Jia
Stars: Tao Zhao, Fan Liao
Length: 136 Minutes
PG Rating: N/A
Reviews: 7 out of 29 found boring (24.13%)

One-line Reviews (29)

With the vivid development of the chapter-style plot (self-indulgence), the role of the coincidence of the character is enough to ignore the ridicule and laughter of my own physiological reasons

Liao Fan's stunning performance just proves again that he is the best actor of his generation.

Riveting, strangely reminiscent at times of Wong Kar-wai and clearly referencing some of Jia's earlier films, especially Unknown Pleasures and Still Life (and his first foray back into gangster territory since A Touch of Sin).

The middle sequence is the most fascinating.

to me this was like viewing the grand opening of the Peoples Congress of China in 1978, in other words slow slower slowest, all proposals done by general acclamation, and deng treng peng to build up the corruption that has been chinas achilles joint ever since.

At the same time there are interspersed numerous entertaining and even comedic moments.

Disco seems to have come late to China: there's an intense, rousing sequence of a massive crowd dancing to the Village People's "YMCA.

Eric Gautier's cinematography is simple, but effective alongside Jia's ever-slow pace, as we observe more than experience.

But that's like saying that Ingmar Bergman is safe and predictable for revisiting similar issues time and again in his movies.

The cinematography is luminous, characters are fascinating, the story is not predictable, and bits of modern China are revealed for the complex wonders that they are.

But there needs to be a movie in there as well somewhere, and the (slow) story here did not transcend its obvious starting (and ending) points, and didn't even built up the characters well enough to make me care.

Zhao Tao gives an engaging performance and Fan Liao, as Bin, is as charming as his character allows.

Whether it's taking place in a corrupt small town, a prison, or a chaotic travel experience, it is always intriguing in a mostly quiet way.

Disco seems to have come late to China: there's an intense, rousing sequence of a massive crowd dancing to the Village People's "YMCA.

More accurately speaking,Ash Is Purest White is a long, drawn out tale of (greatly) unrewarded loyalty on the part of an industrious gangster's girlfriend; on her rise, fall and moderate rise again over the course of 17 years or so, noting the changes across Chinese society in the background.

However, it still inherits the defects of literary and artistic films, such as too many plot branches, slow and tedious lens, especially in the middle section.

" There is a strong thread of humor and one is the snappy dance duo who appear here later turning up with sublime absurdity to perform at a gangster elder's funeral.

Riveting, strangely reminiscent at times of Wong Kar-wai and clearly referencing some of Jia's earlier films, especially Unknown Pleasures and Still Life (and his first foray back into gangster territory since A Touch of Sin).

Boring and slow.

In this most compelling and personal section Qiao, as Maggie Lee puts it, "takes charge of her life with the desperation and resourcefulness that make her an icon of the Chinese can-do spirit.

In this most compelling and personal section Qiao, as Maggie Lee puts it, "takes charge of her life with the desperation and resourcefulness that make her an icon of the Chinese can-do spirit.

Overall, "Ash Is Purest White" is a fascinating journey albeit a cynical one that begins in 2001 and finishes seventeen years later.

Story: We have a female showing foundational support & love for her boyfriend who happens to work on the edge of being a mobster.

The two lead performers, especially Zhao, are engaging as are the occasional rural landscapes especially the ones captured by train travel.

It may also be unexpected that people in mixed society can rely on what after middle age.

The first part of the story about their rise and fall takes place in the early 2000s and is the most purely entertaining with verve and visual impact, even if it covers a mostly familiar trajectory.

" There is a strong thread of humor and one is the snappy dance duo who appear here later turning up with sublime absurdity to perform at a gangster elder's funeral.

A bit slow-moving, but evocative.

its slow and i guess typical chinese realism drama.