Sixteen Candles (1984) - Comedy, Romance

Hohum Score

3

Breathtaking

A girl's "sweet" sixteenth birthday becomes anything but special, as she suffers from every embarrassment possible.

IMDB: 7.1
Director: John Hughes
Stars: Molly Ringwald, Anthony Michael Hall
Length: 93 Minutes
PG Rating: PG
Reviews: 20 out of 180 found boring (11.11%)

One-line Reviews (52)

The plot is fairly simple but it was nice to see it avoided the cliché of having a girl like popular guy who in reality isn't good enough for her then for her to end up with the unpopular guy who is better for her.

Man I remember how much I enjoyed it.

i dont really understand why he would do this, since he likes molly, and why does jake want to leave the pretty girl in the school?

The queen bee is predictable enough, a blonde bombshell that holds the star quarterback type in her claws and smiles sweetly to the rest of the world.

However, for the most part, this is somehow an intriguing movie with memorable conversation scenes.

Don't waste your time.

Well written, snappy pacing, and characters we love in all their weird ways, this is far superior to films like Fast Times At Ridgemont High or American Pie where the aim is to be as lurid and basically sexist as possible.

I saw it with some friends (men and women) who took off before the end because they were falling asleep.

While entertaining, any cinematography was utterly ignored.

' It's still entertaining and is definitely up there in the creation of what makes a teen genre film - so many clichés, so little time!

But, a predictable ending and some goofs that go too far drag the film down a bit.

Still worth watching again and again.

16 Candles, Hughes' firstling, is a prime example of his art, and one that's still entertaining a quarter of a century (sigh!

The scene between Hall and Schoeffling is weak and once Ringwald drops out from the action, the drawn-out end of the film drags a bit.

While the storyline appears to be a little cliché, it is still very relatable and grabs the attention of a younger audience.

Every other teen comedy worth watching since has used 16 candles as a template.

Sixteen Candles is a very cute film that came before the cliché 90's teen flicks.

John Hughes directs his first feature film and sets out his marker for the career that was to come for the astute observer of teen angst and coming of age drama.

The screenplay by John Hughes is well-written and funny with Hughes giving the main and supporting characters hilarious and truly memorable dialog and with scenes that are fresh and exciting.

John Hughes' first film as director is SIXTEEN CANDLES, a fast-moving and complex high school romance with a little salt and verve to make it eminently watchable.

I watched Sixteen Candles for the first time, and i enjoyed it.

The flick is slow, jokes are lousy and everything is stupidly predictable.

Basically, there are lots of high school hijinks with some snappy and clever zingers, the typical dance scene, the house party where the house gets trashed, pure 80's fashion and a lot more.

This 1984 romantic teen comedy is not for kids, but for teenagers and adults who can take some swearing (including the f-bomb, which isn't used much in this film, but isn't completely avoided) and one scene of graphic nudity, it could be worth watching if you like this kind of film.

Unlike the dramatically sound 1985 hit "The Breakfast Club", both Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall fail to entertain whilst Hughes' flat and predictable script struggles to make us laugh, as it mostly resorts to tasteless or weak sex jokes and cheap shots.

Whenever I am bored, in a bad mood, whatever, I pop it in, recite every line, and it makes my day better.

this movie has two great things besides being entertaining and funny.

Complimented with a killer soundtrack, freshmen who look like 12-year-olds paying money to see women's underwear, some great cars and plenty of empty cans of "Old Style," "Sixteen Candles" is classic in every sense of the word.

As a child of the late 80s and early 90s, this film was beyond entertaining.

Acting is bad (specially the 'pretty' boy), peace is slow, jokes are lame and too much of a fairy tale where the 'popular' guy notices the 'poor unpopular' girl out of the blue with idiot lines such as 'I'm tired of partying' which you would never hear from a 18 years-old guy.

Maybe I approached it in the wrong angle, not at all used to the idealism of the 80's, but this movie represented all that was horribly cliché and unrealistic about high school and typical suburban life.

Me with so many others rate this as their favourite Hughes's film, where forget logic, and just get lost in the movie with undertones of real teen angst, where Hughes, like in his other written films, does it in exciting and much humorous ways, with a beautiful ending.

People in this film utter some of the most cliché and dumbest lines I have heard in a long while.

It's, on the whole, a comedy that still works, is still funny and pretty constantly entertaining.

There's no real reward with the relationship between Ringwald and Schoeffling as they don't even speak until the end of the movie, and their dialogue consists of trite lines like "Make a wish.

A real coming of age movie .

And the humor, shallow and predictable though it is, is often pretty funny.

Writer/director John Hughes keeps the enjoyable story zipping along at a snappy pace, maintains a likeable lighthearted tone throughout, presents believable teen characters, astutely nails the joy and anguish of adolescence, and manages a few tender, touching, and thoughtful moments amid all the often raucous and uproarious humor.

it's an entertaining,funny,and cool movie.

John Hughes was able to tap into teen concerns and was known as one of the masters of the coming of age movie...

) Of course, the humour eases the tension of the moving, intense storyline.

The story here is fairly predictable, and follows the vain of teen films before where its main character is secretly in love with someone who either doesn't know or they cannot have and though this was one of the earlier entries with this story, I still didn't find it mesmerising or anything truly engaging.

Director John Hughes has made another coming of age classic!!

A wonderful, enjoyable film that deals with alot of normal teenage issues as well.

Ted's Evaluation -- 3 of 3: Worth watching.

It's perfectly, enjoyable, and while it didn't grab me like some of the formerly mentioned films, it is still an example of a genius at work.

His cast, with the exception of the dull Michael Schoeffling (Jake), are sparky and engaging throughout.

I enjoyed Watanabe's character and little Henry's great line: "I'm not sleeping under a guy named after a duck's dork," but the rest of it was dull as Ringwalds family and friends overlook her title birthday.

The story may be a little uneven in structure and perhaps tone, but overall Sixteen Candles is hugely enjoyable.

I watched it, enjoyed it and would happily see some scenes again.

I can tell Hughes wasn't a rocker because all his teen dramedies contain soundtracks consisting of bland new wave music as opposed to the awesome rock/metal soundtracks of "Fast Times" and 1993's "Dazed and Confused.

A waste of time .