Suffragette (2015) - Biography, Drama, History

Hohum Score

4

Breathtaking

In 1912 London, a young working mother is galvanized into radical political activism supporting the right for women to vote, and is willing to meet violence with violence to achieve this end.

IMDB: 6.9
Director: Sarah Gavron
Stars: Carey Mulligan, Anne-Marie Duff
Length: 106 Minutes
PG Rating: PG-13
Reviews: 10 out of 125 found boring (8%)

One-line Reviews (53)

It's an exciting movie, with schocking scenes as sexual abuse, death, and etc. It's important to make people conscious about history and woman's tragectory.

Still, the likes of Mulligan, Bonham Carter and Garai work hard to invest you in their roles, and it moves with a briskness and efficiency to keep it engaging.

Carey Mulligan plays Maud Watts, an ordinary and anonymous working woman who progressively gets sucked into the anarchic rabble-rousing of an East-end branch of the Pankhurst's Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU).

All in all, I would not just recommend this story to people who want to know more about suffrage and feminist history (this movie falls in the genre 'fictionalized history', which uses history as a backdrop for dramatic storytelling, and is NOT intended to be factually accurate), but also to audiences who just want to see the satisfaction of a downtrodden main character doing her utmost to take back control of her own life, even to the point of radicalization and engaging in violent acts.

Enjoyable!

The great Helena Bonham Carter and many boring scenes .

All that said, the film manages to be compelling despite that it is a stark and dreary 105 minutes.

Stressful and incomplete, but compelling .

Simply Boring .

It's well acted and filmed, and relatively entertaining (of course, defending a fort against the Indians has more oomph to it than standing up against the evil manager of a washhouse).

Maud is a bland character, to say the least, though the filmmakers' focus on her is well-intentioned.

Acting Triumphs over Occasionally Formulaic Plot - Alas, Still Relevant .

Ideological Propaganda With Little Grounding In Reality .

Indeed, the pace of the movie is a tad slow and sort of disengaging.

It portrays in stunning reality how vastly different women were treated a mere 100 years ago.

After watching Suffragette for the second time I had hoped to have formed a different opinion, initially I left the cinema feeling bored and underwhelmed.

The story of Maud's fight for dignity is as gripping and visceral as any thriller, it is also heart breaking and inspirational.

You feel immersed in Edwardian London, from start to finish.

Intense Movie showing the Violent Struggle for Women to Vote .

The movie has some tension due to her broken marriage and the cat and mouse play with the police detective but the slow flow of the events struggles to sustain it at times.

"Suffragette" communicates that principle very clearly and in very entertaining fashion – both in the context of this story's specific issues shown and in the broader context of the ongoing struggle for equal rights by different groups of people in different countries all around the world.

Maud (Mulligan) is the new recruit, dragged in fighting the cause due to principles alone.

Overall, brave, worthy and largely successful if flawed telling of a fascinating, important and relevant piece of history, that has been overlooked.

But where I really liked this film is in the slow awakening of Maud's character.

More than just 'essential viewing,' Suffragette manages to be both educational and entertaining.

This sort of tactic is used throughout the film, making for a film that's as nauseating as it is boring, anchored in mediocrity thanks to a longer runtime for a story that lacks almost any kind of development what so even.

Moving on..This was just dull and I found myself looking away and checking my phone.

Biographical movies are always fascinating.

While the script might be a little too biopic friendly, it's still a rousing film full of outstanding performances.

Entertaining and educational!

Ben Whishaw, on the other hand, is a little dull as Sonny, though the way the character is written deserves a large part of the blame here, and the laundry boss character is too much of a stock pantomime villain-like character.

The storytelling, a vast majority of the time, is spirit-rousing, heart-stopping, moving and inspiring, the ending was really quite powerful.

Intense re-creation of events in London around 1912 .

Overall, the film is extremely compelling and very emotional to watch.

The film is very well-acted, particularly by Streep and Carey Mulligan, it's just a shame they worked so hard on such an ugly and dishonest piece of ideological propaganda.

It was fascinating.

A drab tale of women's rights .

I was ashamed to be a man while women were mistreated, harassed, bullied, abused, denigrated, with most disregard for their well-being, how we men are so cowardly childishly and pathetically gripping dominance to feel of value, in control and safe, while completely blind to the fact that we'll be way better with women as our equal giving the emotional analysis and guidance that we almost completely lack, and that will lead both sexes to happiness, compassion, tenderness, balanced comfort and an enjoyable life, as they are experts on that as they have practice on their houses for millions of years; not giving them equal Rights is a huge detriment for Humanity, and as coward as you can be

The story of the Suffragette Movement and the right for the female vote is a fascinating and quite important part of history that is very much overlooked in film and still holds much relevance today.

While this certainly helps the producers to avoid any criticism for twisting the facts, it also renders the story a bit dull and devoid of passion.

Quite dull in spells, too.

Overall, an enjoyable movie, which I think is worthy of the time spent viewing.

Here is a link to a Library of Congress' paper Why Women Should Vote written sometime after 1896 by Alice Stone Blackwell giving 16 compelling and poignant reasons why women should vote - as relevant today as ever:http://tinyurl.

Content aside, as I wasn't able to finish it, this movie was unwatchable to me because of the jitteriness of the visual style, due to the usage of hand-held cameras throughout the entire film.

The gripping story here dramatizes events that builds to the death of Emily Davison at the 1913 Derby.

Regardless, Suffragette falls under the category of "essential viewing," and it manages to be both entertaining and important.

Carey Mulligan is compelling as Maud watts, the Laundry worker who discovers the WSPU through Violet Miller (Ann Marie Duff) and Shopkeeper Edith Ellyn (Helena Bonham Carter).

An important must see worth watching.

The stunning mediocrity of this film is attributable to numerous different angles, but the ultimate sin is this is a film with an important message, a significant movement, and a chance to voice its ideas at a critical time where the gender gap plays a huge role in every day society - and it chooses to milk it for cheap pathos rather than tell a compelling, factual story.

It is the gripping story of the suffragette movement in England, with brilliant performances by Kerry Mulligan and Helena Bonham-Carter.

Western movies of the 1930-50ies related to an actual historical period, vaguely had something to do with actual historical events, and they sure were entertaining.

Even as most of her peers and some other women were frowning upon the acts and tactics of the Suffragette movement, what made Maude so resolute to join a campaign which is hardly a concern to a woman of her class, while upsetting all of her life seems a bit contrived and incredulous.

The film itself was beautiful, engaging and wonderfully acted.