The Day of the Triffids (1981) - Horror, Sci-Fi, Thriller

Hohum Score

12

Watchable

When a comet blinds nearly everyone in the world, a genetically-engineered species of plant takes over.

IMDB: 7.3
Director:
Stars: John Duttine, Emma Relph
Length: 50 Minutes
PG Rating: N/A
Reviews: 2 out of 37 found boring (5.4%)

One-line Reviews (16)

I didn't remember that many details (except the final scenes where the survivors drive through the fence and out of their triffid-proof enclosure to new life somewhere else), only that I really enjoyed it.

Faithful if a little slow .

And (especially knowing what was to come) I found the tension implicit in the opening episode, in which a temporarily blinded man comes to suspect that something in the world he can't see isn't what it's supposed to be, utterly unbearable.

We all agreed that the story was very compelling, and it reminded us a lot of '28 Days Later,' though much less thrilling.

What remains compelling is the depiction of humans struggling to figure out how best to organize themselves in a post-apocalyptic world.

Pretty faithful to the book and engaging for it .

The book over 41 years old is still very enjoyable now and I have read it more times than I can count and I also recommend having a try of the sequel "night of the Triffids" whilst having a different style it manages to convey the same feeling of creeping menace that the original did.

Weird but strangely entertaining .

Gripping drama at its best .

This is definitely a must-see for fans of classic science fiction, but it leans heavily on the social and sociological aspects of apocalypse rather than scientific speculation, so it's equally entertaining for those interested in a thriller.

But THE DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS overcomes these problems to provide exciting, fast-paced entertainment.

However, if you can digest a bit of kitch together with perhaps a trifle mediocre acting, you will find it entertaining.

) Never to mind, for these few faults, this is still an entertaining and captivating piece of sci-fi that demonstrates a good, strong story is central to making solid entertainment.

Careful camerawork highlighting their roots, shadows, lethal stinging "tongues"; and the eerie Triffid soundeffect, are supremely effective in keeping the horror of death by walking vegetable on the edge of screen throughout.

This BBC mini-series though, is much more faithful to the source material and produces three hours of television that are more about the people than the plants of the title.

A compelling, authentic adaptation .