The Square (2013) - Documentary, News

Hohum Score

20

Watchable

A group of Egyptian revolutionaries battle leaders and regimes, risking their lives to build a new society of conscience.

IMDB: 8.1
Director: Jehane Noujaim
Stars: Ahmed Hassan, Khalid Abdalla
Length: 95 Minutes
PG Rating: N/A
Reviews: 4 out of 43 found boring (9.3%)

One-line Reviews (16)

great but boring .

"So far, so good: not a new perspective on the events, but a fairly gripping and clear narrative of what was happening on the streets of downtown Cairo in the first year of the revolution.

Their words are as perceptive and inspirational as the footage shown of their fellow Egyptians, and by the end this documentary makes a cautionary and exciting case for both the future of Egypt and of ours as a global community.

the documentary mostly made up out of material shot by protesters tells the intense story of the Arab uprising in Egypt, Cairo.

The Chicago Tribune described this film as "A compelling inside look at the cascading series of revolutions and counterrevolutions that have shaken Egypt since the beginning of 2011.

Director Jehane Noujaim takes clips from several video cameras and places them in a confusing order.

A riveting call to arms for democratic ideals.

I feel that it got very intense when I got farther into the documentary and all the more exciting.

It is sad to realize that now that the square is empty, even though the ideals that the people fought and died for are still nowhere to be found.

Even with all this great footage, it was unorganized, confusing, and hard to follow where Noujaim was going.

The fight for a democratic Egypt is far from over, which is part of what makes the film so dynamic and riveting.

It's breathtaking and in stark contrast to the news reports we saw in the U.

I watched it to the end but at about 30 minutes I began to experience extreme boredom.

Director Jehane Noujaim delivers a riveting documentary with "The Square,"which manages to powerfully convey the chaos, complexity, and inherent dangers of a Revolutionary movement.

" To commemorate the one-year anniversary of the political uprising and tragic bloodshed of an African nation demanding a justified revolution, this review will cover the inspirational, immersive and intense film known as 'Al-Midan' (The Square).

Their quest for "conscience" exposes the weakness of the doc as well: Missing a compelling protagonist in a revolution and a documentary leads to a tedious repetition of events without the umbrella of a defining leader with an incendiary philosophy.